Advanced, Accessible Robotics Training

About AMRA

The Australian Medical Robotics Academy (AMRA) was established in 2017 as a non-profit organisation and is governed by a Board with a dedicated CEO. Robotic surgery commenced using the da Vinci system in 2002 and was introduced to Australia by Professor Tony Costello in 2003. Since 2018 there has been exponential growth in the number of procedures performed using the da Vinci robot. The introduction of multiple new robotic systems will only increase the amount of surgery performed using a variety of robotic machines. Eventually almost all thoraco-abdominal and pelvic surgery will be performed using Robotics.

AMRA has developed a unique robotic surgery education program with a linear pathway through a four-tiered curriculum of robotic surgical training. The AMRA curriculum begins with an online curriculum for all surgeons commencing robotic surgery. Following successful completion of the Foundational component, surgeons proceed to simulation and VR education using a proficiency based progression, followed by 3D narrated robotic surgery video instruction. Once these tasks are completed satisfactorily, AMRA provides low and high fidelity synthetic human organ models to teach specific surgeries. These surgeries can be scored through video as a measure robotic surgical proficiency.

AMRA is working closely with Surgical Colleges, Hospitals and Universities to accredit their curriculum to meet the requirements of these training bodies. AMRA is simultaneously in dialogue with the new robot vendor companies, including Intuitive, Medtronic, Cambridge Medical Robotic Systems and Medicaroid Corporation with its hinotori robot.

Vision

AMRA’s vision is of the widespread use of advanced robotic surgical devices in both public and private hospitals by highly trained surgeons, performing complex robotic surgical procedures with fewer complications, faster recovery, and lower overall cost burden to the healthcare system.

AMRA has embraced an aviation method of education, working closely with Qantas. After introduction of pilot simulation training, airlines have reduced their accident rate to a tiny fraction of what it used be. It is 50,000 times more likely to be injured at surgery than in an airline accident. AMRA provides a learning laboratory away from the operating room, proven to be a much more effective place for surgical training and skills uptake for modern surgeons.

Complication rates in surgery at present cause 17% of patients readmitted to hospital within 30 days of their operation. Surgical training has been an apprenticeship, master/slave, operating room based system since Halstead introduced surgical training at Johns Hopkins in in 1904. AMRA aims to disrupt this pathway and produce better skilled surgeons, better quipped for the operating rooms of the future.

AMRA research demonstrates that dedicated robotic surgical training facilities utilising online education, Simulation and VR away from the operating room, will lead to streamlined surgical training with more proficient and safer surgery. This will have profound community benefit.

Advanced Training Program

Training in robot-assisted surgery at AMRA offers a unique combination of robotic surgery education program with a linear pathway through a four-tiered curriculum of robotic surgical training.

Step 1 of the AMRA program is:

A 15 hour Foundational online curriculum for all surgeons commencing robot surgery.

Step 2 is simulation and VR education using a proficiency based progression.

Step 3 is 3D narrated robotic surgery video instruction.

Once these tasks are completed satisfactorily, AMRA provides Step 4:

A revolutionary low and high fidelity synthetic human organ models to teach specific surgeries. These surgeries can be scored through video as a measure robotic surgical proficiency

Comprehensive Curriculum

Broad course range covering all career stages, extending from online courses featuring 3D/stereoscopic narrated videos, through VR simulation to live surgery, all retaining close alignment with RACS training guidelines

VR and Simulation

Virtual reality is integrated from the initial online courses, and is utilised extensively with the simulator-based training

Synthetic Organs

Reduce then eliminate the need for cadavers and animals via lifelike synthetic organs that can be created on demand to simulate both normal and diseased conditions

24/7 Availability

Simulators and robots are not based in operating theatres where there is restricted availability.  Instead, dedicated rooms with 24/7 accessibility increase both the number of trainees for participants to complete additional personal practice sessions

Multi-Vendor

New devices entering the robotic surgery market will open a host of new possibilities.  AMRA will provide training on all key systems, including the well-established da Vinci system plus offerings from CMR Surgical and Medtronic as they commence operations in Australian operating theatres